6 Years After – Why Is Our Hate For Malala Still Strong?

In the past 6 years, it won’t be an exaggeration if we say that Pakistan has changed drastically. We have successfully broken the shackles of societal demographics, beliefs and to some extent intolerance and conservatism. There is one thing we are still not tired of: Hating Malala.
It almost seems like we have fallen deeply in love with criticizing her but the reason is still unknown to most of the people.

Let’s make a collective effort to actually understand the basis of hatred and criticism against Malala.
So, here are the probable reasons why people despise Malala.

Because She Survived

We have a weird habit of sympathizing with the dead and not being able to digest the survivors. This basically gave birth to all type of conspiracy theories because people thought that is was a planned attack because she survived, despite being singled out and shot.

Due to her surviving the attack, people strongly believed that it was all pre-scheduled and was a thoughtful strategy to promote the negative image of Pakistan across the globe. This is why exactly her father and she herself were awarded with the labels of ‘’agents’’.

She Was Endorsed By Western Media

The perception has been built that Malala’s own country hates her because they’re confused between what she stood for and from where she was appreciated. While, to us, an attack on an individual was nothing new as we had developed a habit of seeing the same news almost every day.

But, due to her affiliation with the bigger international platforms, along with being celebrated as a survivor of terrorism she was lauded as a hero and a symbol of women empowerment in the West.

Why Did She Get More Attention Than Other Survivors

Most of the people are oblivious to the fact that Malala was known and had a reputation before the attack. What garnered the attention towards her was basically the speech that she gave in Peshawar in September 2008. The title of the speech was, ‘’How Dare the Taliban Take Away My Basic Right to Education’’ when Taliban started attacking girls schools in Swat.

When she was 12 years old, she started blogging for BBC and initiated writing about how it was to live under Taliban’s threats and how their basic human right to education was being denied. She kept hiding her identity and wrote under the name of ‘Gul Makai’ and was later revealed in December 2009.

Her efforts resulted in her nomination for International Children Peace Prize in 2011 and were awarded Pakistan’s National Youth Peace Prize in the same year. Remember that this is a snapshot of her achievements before she was attached.

She Won The Nobel Peace Prize Over Edhi

Malala also became the youngest Nobel Peace Prize Laureate not only in Pakistan but in the world. However, the most prestigious award in most people’s opinion went to the wrong person. People strongly believe that Edhi deserved it more. The idea that it was purposefully done because Malala opened to the world the negative image of Pakistan, while Edhi is a positive side that west doesn’t want rest of the world to see is also commonly worshiped in Pakistan. Malala herself has addressed this criticism on numerous occasions saying that even Nobel Prize can’t do justice to Edhi’s services.

She even said that being a winner, she has the opportunity to choose one of the nominees and she chose Edhi because she thinks he deserved it more than her.

She Didn’t Come To Pakistan And Started Pursuing A Career Abroad

People are quite upset over the fact that she didn’t come to Pakistan after getting attacked. However, the fact that she was singled out and attacked is often ignored and we are in denial that her life is still under threat in Pakistan.

Malala herself says that she doesn’t understand the basis of the hate she receives from the people of her own country whom she wants to stand up for. In an interview, she said,

‘’I don’t understand why they oppose me, I love Pakistan and I want a better future for this country…my focus is only working for the good’’ (Source: The Diplomat)

Did we miss out on something? Let us know in the comments bar below.

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