High Arsenic Levels In Chicken Meat Can Kill

There is a lot of debate and a very little consensus on the question that how much amount of arsenic is safe in food – because ideally, there should not be any.

A study led by a research group at the department of community health sciences (CHS) at the AKU (Aga Khan University) and Jichi Medical University of Japan revealed that newborns are most exposed to arsenic from chicken, which has the highest content. The said research identified important sources of lead and arsenic exposure, particularly among newborns, children between the age of one and three years and pregnant women in both countries.

 

The study found out that in comparison with potatoes and lentils, who were cooked in different utensils, the arsenic content in chicken was five times higher. Note that chicken is a part of our daily nutritional intake as a significant protein source.

“In comparison with potato and lentils cooked in different types of utensils, poultry chicken meat contained 15 times higher concentration of arsenic (between 41ng/g and 47ng/g)” – said Dr Abdul Ghani from AKU.

Chicken meat, particularly chicken liver, contains high arsenic content which can lead to skin diseases, kidney malignant growth and more.

“It’s not one-time eating but frequent consumption of the same food that affects the body as metal traces accumulate in the body” – he added.

Speaking more about the study, Dr Ambreen Sahito told that 60 per cent of newborns and about 90 per cent of children had blood lead levels that exceeded CDC guidelines. It can be seen as a potential risk for lifelong health consequences. 35% of the rural population had an arsenic level more than the WHO (World Health Organization) recommended levels of 10mcg/I.

Blood lead levels were also found higher in women who eat rice regularly. As per the experts, the exposure to lead can be limited by simple home activities like by maintaining hand hygiene and wet mopping.

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