Human activities alone causing 60% threats to forests and its species; WWF

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    • The study says that deforestation, illegal wildlife trade, unsustainable hunting, invasive species, climate change and disease all threaten the forests.
    • Forest-dwelling wildlife has declined on an average by 53 percent over the past five decades.
    • The report calls for making more sustainable consumption and production models.
    • Pakistan is losing the tree cover because it exports the wood and wood bases products and its tree cutting rate exceeds the growth rate and tree plantation rate.

 

WWF_Below_the_canopy_report

WWF’s Below the Canopy report (world’s first-ever global assessment of forest inhabiting species) says that deforestation, illegal wildlife trade, unsustainable hunting, invasive species, climate change and disease all threaten the forests and forest’s species.

The report claims that habitat loss and forest degradation alone caused by anthropogenic activities cause 60 percent of the threats to forests. The report also shows that that the forest-dwelling wildlife have declined on an average by 53 percent over the past five decades mentioning that the majority of these losses occurred in the tropical forests where the highest number of forest species live.

The impact of this loss goes beyond wildlife as the health of forests and the health of people on this planet is interrelated in so many ways. Forests not only hold the soil particles and provide shelter to wildlife but also help mitigate climate change.

The underlined report calls for the action by world leaders to avert the climate breakdown and to safeguard the planet’s remaining natural spaces by making more sustainable consumption and production models.

WWF’s report read that the forest’s dwelling species can recover and thrive again and shared the success stories of monkeys in Costa Rica and gorillas in central and east Africa, adding that the forests are our greatest natural ally in the fight against the climate breakdown and we lost them at our peril.

The report also suggests to the heads of the states to develop a new global agreement at the 75th UN General Assembly meeting next year when the organization is expected to negotiate new targets for the convention on biological diversity.

The concern goes equally well for Pakistan because only a meager percentage of the country’s land is covered with the forests and the worst part is that the land occupied by the forests has fallen considerably over the decades. Pakistan is losing the tree cover because it exports the wood and wood based products and the tree cutting rate exceeds the growth rate and tree plantation rate.

Also See: IPCC Calls For Reducing Meat & Increasing Plant-Based Diets To Save The Environment

The current government of the country has taken the initiative of billion tree tsunami that will help increase the tree cover of the motherland but still a lot more is needed to be done to avert the climatic tragedies.

What do you suggest to save the endangered wildlife species especially in Pakistan? Share your thoughts in the comment section

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