Pakistani kinnow sales in Arab Gulf countries surge by 29%

According to the exporters of the fruit, Pakistan’s aromatic kinnow sold quite well in the Middle East, where its export grew by 29% due to its unique flavor.

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First Container of Pakistani Kinnow Mandarins Arrives at Dalian Port | Produce ReportPakistan has earned a sizeable revenue of $253 million by exporting 460,000 tons of kinnow during the latest season.

The country mainly benefited from the robust demand for the fruit in the Middle Eastern markets, according to a representative of the business community involved in the trade on Saturday.

Pakistan says expects free-trade talks with Gulf countries by June | Arab News PK

Initially, Pakistani traders had set an export target of 350,000 tons of the fruit with expected earnings of $210 million.

Nevertheless, they ended up shipping the highest ever export volume in the country’s history toward the end of the 2020-21 season. 

“The demand for kinnow underwent a significant surge globally due to the COVID-19 pandemic since citrus fruits play a vital role in strengthening our immunity system,” Waheed Ahmed, patron-in-chief of the All Pakistan Exporters, Importers, and Merchants Association, said. 

During the export season that concluded in April 2021, Pakistan’s international kinnow sales surged by 30% compared to the previous period when it sold 353,000 tons. 

According to the exporters of the fruit, Pakistan’s aromatic kinnow sold quite well in the Middle East, where its export grew by 29% due to its unique flavor.

Pakistan exported about 43,998 tons of kinnow to the United Arab Emirates (UAE), which was 38% higher than its sales in the previous season.

The country’s export of the fruit to Saudi Arabia also increased by about 9%, where it sold a quantum of about 21,970 tons.

Pakistan also shipped about 66,700 tons of kinnow to other gulf countries, including Oman, Qatar, and Iraq.

“Due to the efforts and extensive assistance of the government, the country managed to export a much greater volume of the fruit than anticipated,” Ahmed said. 

Nevertheless, he added that individual Pakistani exporters sustained substantial financial losses despite selling more kinnow due to the dollar-rupee exchange rate fluctuations.

“The export orders actualized when the exchange rate stood at ₨. 168,” he said.

“By the time the payments were made, the Pakistani rupee had gained greater stability, and the exchange rate was at ₨. 153.”

He also believed that the commodity did not get its fair price in the global market since the freight cost disproportionately increased due to international lockdowns.

Meanwhile, local exporters experienced their highest losses in the Russian market.

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