‘eDoctor’ initiative brings back 700 lady doctors who had left the profession due to family issues

All the doctors had left the profession 18 months back due to family or personal issues.

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A technology-driven initiative by one of the oldest public sector medical universities in Pakistan has thrived in bringing 700 lady doctors back to the profession. All the doctors had left the profession 18 months back due to family or personal issues.

The initiative is called ‘eDoctor’ by the Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS). It will make around 35,000 female doctors, who completed education with the help of the state or privately and are no longer indulged in the professional sphere, part of the country’s segment again.

As per the officials, the 700 Pakistani lady doctors are those women who are now residing in foreign countries. The departments of such a large number of lady doctors have increased the gap between demand and supply in the country’s healthcare and medical services in low-income communities.

Rs. 3.5 billion recovered:

Rs. 5 million is spent on a doctor’s education, as per health officials and professionals.
By bringing these 700 lady doctors back to the profession, the state has recovered Rs. 3.5 billion, which can be injected into the country’s healthcare system.

IT-enabled lady doctors can really help in improving the healthcare system in the country, prevent maternal and new-born mortality rates, support population planning campaigns, polio, and epidemics, like dengue and typhoid, etc.

“The project is catering to the uplift for currently out of work lady doctors, who have been out of professional practice due to their family or social issues,” – said Prof Dr. Jehan Ara Ainuddin, academic head of eDoctor and the head of obstetrics and gynecology at the DUHS.

“The concept has been designed to use the innovative technological tools in reconnecting these out of work lady doctors on a single platform, provide them virtual based teaching of new and updated medial education in form of a reach program covering all aspects required to be a general physician.” – she continued.

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