United States REVEALS the number of nuclear weapons in the U.S. stockpile

The disclosure comes after a reversal of a Trump-era policy, which saw the blacking out of the data four years ago.

In this photo, nuclear weapons are shown in front of the flag of the United States of America.
In this photo, nuclear weapons are shown in front of the flag of the United States of America.

The United States (U.S.) State Department has revealed the number of nuclear weapons in the U.S. stockpile.

The disclosure comes after a reversal of a Trump-era policy, which saw the blacking out of the data four years ago.

According to details, the total number of nuclear weapons —both active and inactive— was listed at 3,750 as of the 30th of September, 2020.

The figure for the year 2020 is down from 3,805 in 2019 and 3,785 in 2018.

It is pertinent to note here that the United States’ nuclear stockpiles are slowly but surely decreasing annually.

The United States' nuclear stockpiles are slowly but surely decreasing annually. (U.S. State Department)
The United States’ nuclear stockpiles are slowly but surely decreasing annually. (U.S. State Department)

 In 2003, in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks and the start of the United States’ so-called “war on terror,” the number of nuclear weapons totaled around 10,000.

However, the United States’ total nuclear weapon stockpile peaked in 1967 during the height of the cold war with the Soviet Union, with a total of 31,255 nuclear warheads.

The last time the U.S. government released the list of its stockpile was in March 2018, where the stockpile of September 2017 was disclosed.

This was during the early days of the era of the former U.S. President, Donald Trump.

In the following months after that, the Trump administration decided to keep the updated numbers a state secret and turned down an offer by the Federation of American Scientists to declassify them.

However, the current U.S. President, Joe Biden, has opted for a different approach by releasing the total number of nuclear warheads stored in the U.S. stockpile.

“Back to transparency,” remarked Hans Kristensen, the director of the Nuclear Information Project at the Federation of American Scientists.


Read More: Iran’s Fast-Expanding Nuclear Program – The History, The Progress, And The ‘Breaches’


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