Yasmeen Lari receives Royal Gold Medal from King Charles for designing homes for Pakistan’s poverty-stricken communities

Not only is this positive news for the country, but the Royal Gold Medal has now become the first architecture medal of King Charles's reign.

Yasmeen Lari receives Royal Gold Medal from King Charles for designing homes for Pakistan's poverty-stricken communities

In an exciting achievement, Pakistan’s first female architect Yasmeen Lari has received the prestigious Royal Gold Medal from King Charles.

Not only is this positive news for the country, but the Royal Gold Medal has now become the first architecture medal of King Charles’s reign. The renowned Lari received the award in recognition of her role in designing homes for Pakistan’s poverty-stricken and vulnerable community after she retired from her practice.

 

Yasmeen Lari receives the Royal Gold Medal

Some of Lari’s most important work has been through the Heritage Foundation of Pakistan, which she founded with her husband. In the last 23 years, they have come up with creative, and practical solutions for those communities of the country, which were hit by natural disasters like floods and earthquakes.

Who is Yasmeen Lari?

Lari was born in Dera Ghazi Khan. She shifted to London with her family when she was only fifteen years of age and pursued higher education at Oxford Brookes University. Finally, she moved back to Karachi in 1964 and inaugurated Lari Associates, along with her husband.

The two started the Heritage Foundation of Pakistan in 1980. Since then, the project has been spearheading conservation projects around rural villages in Pakistan, earning it the Recognition Award from the United Nations. Lari has received multiple accolades for her work, including the Sitara-e-Imtiaz in 2006 and the Fukoka Award in 2016.

Lari retired after she grew tired of trying to please big corporate clients. In 2005, an earthquake of 7.6 magnitude hit northern Pakistan, leaving 400,000 people displaced. This deeply impacted her, and Lari felt like she needed to help.

“I had no idea what I could do as an architect. I’d never done any disaster work, or any projects in the mountains.  I had no workforce, I’d given up my practice. But I found that, if you do something beyond your usual comfort zone, then help will always come,” she said.

What are your views on this? Share in the comments bar below.


Featured Content⭐

>